What you Need to Know about Trauma and Cellular Memory

Trauma Nature Kinesiologist

As we all know, our body is made-up of cells, but what you may not realise is that each of these individual cells holds and records information like a memory – we call this cellular memory. This means that every impactful experience that we have been through is imprinted into our cells. This imprint is left not only in our mind or in our nervous system, but also in every single cell in our body.

When someone has been through emotional turmoil you may have heard the expression: “it hit me hard” or “ I felt it with every fibre of my being.” Even if you didn’t know that cells have a memory, intuitively, you probably realised that they do on an unconscious level. What we’re describing here in these expressions is the physical reaction when something deeply significant happens to us and we have a cellular response to it.

Cellular memory means that trauma can have a long lasting or even delayed affect on our body, even if we have “worked through” the trauma psychologically. Insomnia, IBS, inflammatory diseases and more can be as a result of cellular memory after trauma. However, manifestation of traumas varies from person to person. What they all have in common is the impact on our immune system and therefore our health.

Trauma is an embodied experience. It lives in people’s bones, veins, arteries, tissues, muscles and organs. It’s in their cells, hearts and souls.

Some traumas are an obvious result from past experience like any type of abuse from neglect to sexual abuse. There are also less obvious types of traumas, but these are still capable of locking depression, generalized anxiety, or disturbed sleep patterns in place. People often associate trauma with emotional disturbance but traumas can also be the result of physical injuries.

Most people don’t realise that trauma can be trans-generational transmitted, or even carried down in the bloodline. Trauma can remain stuck at cellular level for a very long time and it is possible it may never be released. But it is important to identify trauma so that it can be addressed in some way.

It is important to consider is that every individual is unique and thanks to this uniqueness healing process varies too.

There are many amazing modalities to help releasing traumas, all incredible in their own rights. People may go to therapy talk therapy, or they might go to church, nature or any activity that might support them during their journey.

My own 7-years intense healing work, particularly focused to strengthen my body after cancer, meant I was strong enough to face, 35 years after it happened, the immense emotional trauma experienced in watching my biological mother dying in front of my eyes at the age of 16, which in many ways I link to the breast cancer I developed. Since the realisation, cleansing through painful moments and quite a fair amount of tears, something has shifted in my body and my energy’s field and now I feel somehow at home in own body.

It is never too late to think about working on releasing trauma.

As a Systematic Kinesiologist, I am trained to help release stressful emotions, traumas, negative thought patterns and behaviours that are causing us to behave in ways that are holding us back from living in full brightness. Negative energy is trapped in our Cellular Memory and we must aim to remove and release it if we are to move forward and live full, healthy, energised, peaceful, happy lives.

If you would like to discuss trauma, or anything else discussed in this blog post, please do not hesitate to get in touch.

Advertisements

Gut Health and How it Affects Physical and Mental Health

The 29th May is World Digestive Health Day and I wanted to take the opportunity to talk to you about gut health. As a Kinesiologist I use muscle testing to understand what is going on in your body and your meridian system. My work encompasses principles of Traditional Chinese Medicine and other techniques that support physical and emotional healing and getting your body in balance. This includes looking at nutrition and gut health.

Avocado Berries Gut Health

Have you considered the expression “you are what you eat”? Or more appropriately we could say, you are what you digest.

Until recently doctors didn’t understand the link between the gut and the brain and they treated them as two completely unrelated parts of the body. Neuroscience has moved on and various news reported in the mainstream press have shown the scientific proof that the gut and the brain are in-fact very linked. Many doctors now refer to the gut as the “second brain”.

The new evidence reveals that there is a direct communication between gut microbiome (the microorganisms in a particular environment) and brain. The microbiome has direct communication to the brain and they constantly exchange messages. The highway between gut and brain is called the Vagus nerve – it is the longest cranial nerve running from head to stomach and it has the widest distribution area of all nerves in the body. This nerve connects the body in a way that means what affects our gut will affect our brain. If you are not eating the “right” foods, or indeed not getting all you need from your food [see my post on supplements here] then it stands to follow that this will not only affect your gut, but your brain too.

Our microbiome are completely unique to us and no one can have the same make-up as ours – similar to our unique fingerprints. Yet unlike a fingerprint, our microbiome can change and change fast – based on factors such as medication like antibiotics, lifestyle, diet and more. These changes to our microbiome will have knock on affect to our brain and our body.

It is emerged, for example, that significant stress can produce dysbiosis (this is a term for a microbial imbalance or maladaptation on or inside the body, such as an impaired microbiota – https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dysbiosis) in a very short period of time. Meaning, that the response to mood or emotion it will impact the balance of our microbioma.

There are studies that show autistic children have distinctly different microbiome compared to neurotypical children. Read more about this here.

Mainstream science is reporting what Eastern and alternative practices have believed for some time that beneficial bacteria in the gut may replace the need for antidepressants and anti-anxiety drugs. These new developments could mean some “depression and anxiety” is seen as symptoms and not illness.

I have seen clients suffering with low mood, depression and lack of self-esteem – the majority have seen great improvements after balancing the gut with different Kinesiology techniques as well as looking at their diet introducing probiotics, looking at food intolerances and lifestyle.

If you are keen to explore the gut and brain link, or simply want to find out more about how I can help you, do get in touch Barbara@equilibriumvitae.net

 

 

What is Stress and How can Kinesiology Help?

Stress Kinesiology

Do you have trouble sleeping, have headaches or an irritable bowel? Are you low in energy and are you frequently catching colds and viruses? You could be stressed.

We have all heard the word “stress” and have probably even described ourselves as stressed at some point in our lives. Personally, I hear it from someone at least every week – from clients describing their symptoms to friends’ posts on social media. We are surrounded by stress – mothers explaining they are stressed out with the children, bosses complaining they are stressed at work, people distressed from a relationship or family life under stress.

The word itself, ‘stress’, carries negative connotations and there are many causes of stress. Everyone has different stress triggers but some typical major causes of stress can be bereavement, family break-ups and divorce, financial problems and illness or injury.

You might have a general idea of what you think stress is but a lot of people don’t realise the impact stress can have on our physical and mental health. Stress manifests differently in a lot of people and symptoms can range from constipation and bowel issues to general aches and pains. But beneath the surface chronic stress can be doing even more damage.

Under stress our body reacts as being under attack and switches to ‘fight or flight’ mode. Fight or flight is actually a response we have brought on by stress hormones, namely, cortisol, adrenaline, and norepinephrine.

Adrenaline causes your heart to beat faster and raises blood pressure. Cortisol can interfere with the function of the inner lining of your blood vessels that can cause plaque build up in your arteries. This increases your risk of heart disease and stroke. Norepinephrine is similar to adrenaline and increases blood pressure and blood glucose.

Chronic stress often results in high blood pressure and heart diseases as well as weight gain too, but this isn’t all. It interferes with your entire immune system so your body struggles to do the job of keeping you protected and healthy.

Chronic stress even causes epigenetic changes. For those you who haven’t heard of epigenetics, it is the ability of the DNA to change itself and how it is expressed, but that is for another blog post. Stress triggers systemic inflammation that is the culprit for various chronic diseases such as colitis.

The link between stress and detrimental events in the gut is well documented. Stress can affect your gut in numerous ways including:

  • Lessened nutrient absorption
  • Decreased oxygenation to your gut
  • Significant drop of blood flow to your digestive system – this in turn leads to a decreased metabolism

Scientists and researchers are finding out more about our bodies all the time and we now know that our gut and brain are in constant communication. More and more studies are being conducted and they are showing a strong link between gut and brain.

You may have noticed in the news that more emphasis and attention is being given to diet to treat depressive and mental health illnesses. This is in response to this new found evidence about the gut and brain link.

In this day and age we know that stress is unavoidable so we need to find ways to prevent it to become chronic.

As a Kinesiologist I look at:

  • Diet – certain types of food and alcohol can increase stress
  • Lifestyle – help clients to find ways to have me time without feeling guilty
  • Restoring the body’s alignment using multiple technique
  • Emotional stress release technique

These are just some of the areas I can look at to treat someone suffering with chronic stress. Most importantly, I start peeling off the layers to get to the root cause.

Please contact me at Barbara@equilibriumvitae.net if you want to discuss any particular issue.

 

Supplements? I’m getting everything I need from my diet…

supplements nutrition kinesiology

No one can deny that what we put into our body matters and most people are in agreement that what we eat affects our health. Our body is designed to heal itself but if we have nutritional voids in our diet, our bodies are unable to repair themselves and stay healthy. Addressing nutritional deficiencies affects our whole well-being – physically, emotionally and spiritually.

In the modern society, it has become difficult to get the right nutrients completely from food due to a combination of various factors including busy life and modern diet that includes a lot of processed food.

The right balance of nutrients in our food can help us enjoy life more and get sick less. Toxins and environmental pollutions have contributed in the depletion of our soil and it cannot produce the right amount of mineral and vitamins that our bodies need to stay strong.

The body needs vitamin and minerals, omega fatty acids and of course water is essential to avoid dehydration too. But, have you considered that each person’s body has a different need in terms of nutrition too?

I see clients that have experienced improved concentration, less mood swings and more happiness simply by reducing sugar from their diet. There are clients who were told by their doctors that they suffered with IBS turned up that what they needed was detoxing either form parasites or metal toxicity.

Personal stories, where you live, the type of life you lead has an impact on our system and it should be addressed individually.

Take, Amy, for example. Amy is a young student that for years has been suffering from IBS, at least that were the symptoms and her GP substantiated the diagnosis. She was about to go to university in a different town and was scared. She didn’t know what to do as nothing seemed to improve this “IBS” and so she sought alternative help. Her IBS symptoms went by cleansing the parasites and increasing her Vitamin C level.

I always emphasise to my clients the importance of well-sourced quality supplements as well as good balanced diet.

There are so many supplements you can buy over the counter in the supermarket or in high street chains and pharmacies, but all to often what you pay for is what you get. The cheaper vitamins and supplements have very little of the goodness in them and are full of binders, powders and fillers.

Good quality supplements can be a big cost on a family’s budget and it can feel like an unnecessary expense. But remember, just because we cannot quantify the savings in future and potential health costs, it doesn’t mean it isn’t important and a good investment in yourself and well-being.

Our bodies require a variety of other nutritional elements to remain in balance. Nutrition is just one of the elements that affects the balance in our bodies and energies.

Kinesiology can identify deficiencies and imbalances in the body including nutritional deficiencies. When addressed, balance can be restored and you are able to live a healthier and happier life.

If you would like to find out more about how I can help you, please get in touch.