What you Need to Know about Trauma and Cellular Memory

Trauma Nature Kinesiologist

As we all know, our body is made-up of cells, but what you may not realise is that each of these individual cells holds and records information like a memory – we call this cellular memory. This means that every impactful experience that we have been through is imprinted into our cells. This imprint is left not only in our mind or in our nervous system, but also in every single cell in our body.

When someone has been through emotional turmoil you may have heard the expression: “it hit me hard” or “ I felt it with every fibre of my being.” Even if you didn’t know that cells have a memory, intuitively, you probably realised that they do on an unconscious level. What we’re describing here in these expressions is the physical reaction when something deeply significant happens to us and we have a cellular response to it.

Cellular memory means that trauma can have a long lasting or even delayed affect on our body, even if we have “worked through” the trauma psychologically. Insomnia, IBS, inflammatory diseases and more can be as a result of cellular memory after trauma. However, manifestation of traumas varies from person to person. What they all have in common is the impact on our immune system and therefore our health.

Trauma is an embodied experience. It lives in people’s bones, veins, arteries, tissues, muscles and organs. It’s in their cells, hearts and souls.

Some traumas are an obvious result from past experience like any type of abuse from neglect to sexual abuse. There are also less obvious types of traumas, but these are still capable of locking depression, generalized anxiety, or disturbed sleep patterns in place. People often associate trauma with emotional disturbance but traumas can also be the result of physical injuries.

Most people don’t realise that trauma can be trans-generational transmitted, or even carried down in the bloodline. Trauma can remain stuck at cellular level for a very long time and it is possible it may never be released. But it is important to identify trauma so that it can be addressed in some way.

It is important to consider is that every individual is unique and thanks to this uniqueness healing process varies too.

There are many amazing modalities to help releasing traumas, all incredible in their own rights. People may go to therapy talk therapy, or they might go to church, nature or any activity that might support them during their journey.

My own 7-years intense healing work, particularly focused to strengthen my body after cancer, meant I was strong enough to face, 35 years after it happened, the immense emotional trauma experienced in watching my biological mother dying in front of my eyes at the age of 16, which in many ways I link to the breast cancer I developed. Since the realisation, cleansing through painful moments and quite a fair amount of tears, something has shifted in my body and my energy’s field and now I feel somehow at home in own body.

It is never too late to think about working on releasing trauma.

As a Systematic Kinesiologist, I am trained to help release stressful emotions, traumas, negative thought patterns and behaviours that are causing us to behave in ways that are holding us back from living in full brightness. Negative energy is trapped in our Cellular Memory and we must aim to remove and release it if we are to move forward and live full, healthy, energised, peaceful, happy lives.

If you would like to discuss trauma, or anything else discussed in this blog post, please do not hesitate to get in touch.

Gut Health and How it Affects Physical and Mental Health

The 29th May is World Digestive Health Day and I wanted to take the opportunity to talk to you about gut health. As a Kinesiologist I use muscle testing to understand what is going on in your body and your meridian system. My work encompasses principles of Traditional Chinese Medicine and other techniques that support physical and emotional healing and getting your body in balance. This includes looking at nutrition and gut health.

Avocado Berries Gut Health

Have you considered the expression “you are what you eat”? Or more appropriately we could say, you are what you digest.

Until recently doctors didn’t understand the link between the gut and the brain and they treated them as two completely unrelated parts of the body. Neuroscience has moved on and various news reported in the mainstream press have shown the scientific proof that the gut and the brain are in-fact very linked. Many doctors now refer to the gut as the “second brain”.

The new evidence reveals that there is a direct communication between gut microbiome (the microorganisms in a particular environment) and brain. The microbiome has direct communication to the brain and they constantly exchange messages. The highway between gut and brain is called the Vagus nerve – it is the longest cranial nerve running from head to stomach and it has the widest distribution area of all nerves in the body. This nerve connects the body in a way that means what affects our gut will affect our brain. If you are not eating the “right” foods, or indeed not getting all you need from your food [see my post on supplements here] then it stands to follow that this will not only affect your gut, but your brain too.

Our microbiome are completely unique to us and no one can have the same make-up as ours – similar to our unique fingerprints. Yet unlike a fingerprint, our microbiome can change and change fast – based on factors such as medication like antibiotics, lifestyle, diet and more. These changes to our microbiome will have knock on affect to our brain and our body.

It is emerged, for example, that significant stress can produce dysbiosis (this is a term for a microbial imbalance or maladaptation on or inside the body, such as an impaired microbiota – https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dysbiosis) in a very short period of time. Meaning, that the response to mood or emotion it will impact the balance of our microbioma.

There are studies that show autistic children have distinctly different microbiome compared to neurotypical children. Read more about this here.

Mainstream science is reporting what Eastern and alternative practices have believed for some time that beneficial bacteria in the gut may replace the need for antidepressants and anti-anxiety drugs. These new developments could mean some “depression and anxiety” is seen as symptoms and not illness.

I have seen clients suffering with low mood, depression and lack of self-esteem – the majority have seen great improvements after balancing the gut with different Kinesiology techniques as well as looking at their diet introducing probiotics, looking at food intolerances and lifestyle.

If you are keen to explore the gut and brain link, or simply want to find out more about how I can help you, do get in touch Barbara@equilibriumvitae.net